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PROGRAMS & SERVICES

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Programs and Services

Each day our nearly 200 dedicated team members make a positive impact on the lives of over 1000 people daily helping Philadelphia's most vulnerable populations secure housing, food, income and other critical needs and services.

SELF's Emergency Housing Sites
Ife Wellness

Community members, community based-organizations, and The Office of Homeless Services (OHS) serve as referral sources for program participants appropriate for Ife Wellness Center (IWC).Ife Wellness Center is a  recovery and housing focused, transformational emergency housing site and program for both men and women. Working with multi-disciplinary partners i.e., physical and behavioral health, substance use recovery, and permanent housing; the expectation is that participants coming into Ife Wellness Center are working towards a successful transformation to becoming self-sufficient, independent, drug and alcohol free and permanently housed.

Services include:

•             Shelter, meals, showers, laundry

•             Access to physical and behavioral health services

•             Access to drug and alcohol treatment and recovery housing

•             Access to employment and pre-employment skills building

•             Access to public benefits

•             Access to housing opportunities

•             Access to spiritual and wellness supports

•             Access to transportation 

 

To ensure the safety of campus neighbors, team members, participants, and the neighboring community, the program security plan includes internal facility and perimeter security, as well as a comprehensive security monitoring system and facility room-checks.

 
 
Outley House, Station House, and Susquehanna House

The Office of Homeless Services (OHS) serves as the sole referral source for program participants deemed appropriate for Outley House, Station House, and Susquehanna House Emergency Housing program. Participants are screened through the standard OHS Intake Center process with additional questions and information collection as needed. Both Outley House (named in honor of our founder Dr. Sylvester Outley) and Station House serve single, adult men who are experiencing homelessness and are between the ages of 18 and 70+ years old.  Susquehanna House serves single, adult women experiencing homelessness who are between the ages of 18 and 60+. The average length of stay in these emergency housing facilities is six months to two years.   While there are a number social and emergency-related services available for families with children, there remains a significant gap in similar services for single men and women. Our emergency participants have access to an array of services that include skill building platforms, personal and character development opportunities, behavioral and physical health services, education, independent living preparation, permanency planning, and access to resources and community contacts. Both Outley and Station are emergency housing sights for individuals who identify as men, while Susquehanna House serves individuals who identify as women.

Team members and partners provide:

  • Support designed to shorten emergency housing stays and promote rapid movement to permanent housing.  

  • Housing Focused Case Management (HFCS), which is critical to moving participants to permanent housing.  HFCS includes but is not be limited to an assessment of participant housing and housing-related needs soon after they enter emergency housing, the development of an individualized housing plan that includes housing directed goals and timetables, assessment of other service needs and referrals to the appropriate resources, and regular and consistent follow-up.

  • Timetables for completion of the goals are ambitious and coordinated with the 90-day target for movement to permanent housing.

  • A program focus that addresses the needs of the participant to develop the skills necessary to transition to independence and permanent housing.

 

 Evidence-based programs include:

  • Education Training (offered by the Office of Adult Education)

  • Structured leisure (evening and weekend) time

  • Employment Opportunities

  • Health Initiatives Offered by Temple University Medical Students

    • Wellness

    • Health Education

    • Resolving Medical Issues
       

  • Life Skills Development

    • Men Groups

    • Upkeep of Home and Surrounding Property

    • Recovery

    • Overcoming and Concurring Barriers

    • Personal Appearance

    • Grooming

    • Personal Hygiene

    • Budgeting
       

  • Community Connections and Supportive Relationships

    • Familiar Engagement and Involvement

    • Community Engagement and Involvement

    • Involvement with Local Civic, Cultural and Religious Institutions

 
Richard Jones Recovery 

The City of Philadelphia’s Office of Addiction Services (OAS) serves as the sole referral source for program participants deemed appropriate for Richard Jones Recovery House program. Participants are screened through the standard OAS Intake Center process with additional questions and information collection as needed along with being interviewed by the recovery house staff before admission to ensure that it is a good fit for him.

RJRH serves single, adult men between the ages of 18 and 60+ who are experiencing homelessness.  The average length of stay for participants staying in the 12-capacity shelter is three months. While there are a number of social and emergency related services available for families with children, there remains a significant gap in similar services for single men.

 

Richard Jones Recovery House team members and partners:

  • Provide supports and a comprehensive array of services designed to facilitate participant movement toward self-sufficiency by providing a bridge to long-term, permanent housing.  

  • Provide Housing Focused Case Management (HFCS), which is critical to moving participants to permanent housing. HFCS includes, but is not be limited to an assessment of participant housing and housing-related needs soon after they enter they recovery house; the development of an individualized housing plan that includes housing directed goals and timetables; assessment of other service needs and referrals to the appropriate resources and regular; and consistent follow-up.

  • Offer timetables for completion of the goals that are ambitious and coordinate with the 90-day target for movement to permanent housing.

  • Provide an environment in which services and programmatic activities are designed to support participants in preparation for permanent housing.  

  • Address the need of the participant to develop the skills necessary to transition to independence and permanent housing.

 

RJRH participants have access to an array of services that include skill building platforms, personal and character development opportunities, behavioral and physical health services, education, independent living preparation, permanency planning, and access to resources and community contacts.

 

Evidence-based programs at RJRH include:

  • Education Training (offered by the Office of Adult Education)

  • Structured leisure (evening and weekend) time

  • Employment Opportunities

  • Health Initiatives Offered by Temple University Medical Students

    • Wellness

    • Health Education

    • Resolving Medical Issues
       

  • Life Skills Development

    • Men Groups

    • Upkeep of home and surrounding property

    • Recovery

    • Overcoming and Concurring Barriers

    • Personal Appearance

    • Grooming

    • Personal Hygiene

    • Budgeting
       

  • Community Connections and Supportive Relationships

    • Familial Engagement and Involvement

    • Community Engagement and Involvement

    • Involvement with Local Civic, Cultural and Religious Institutions

 
Safe Haven

The City of Philadelphia’s Department of Behavioral Health and Disability Services (DBHIDS) serves as the sole referral source for program participants deemed appropriate for Safe Haven. Outreach workers engage participants and screen to see if they meet the criteria for Chronicle Homelessness prior to contacting DBHIDS. Participants approved for admission are those who meet the definition of chronicle homelessness (one year of continuous homelessness or four episodes of homelessness in the past three years).

Safe Haven participants are single, adult men experiencing homelessness and have serious mental illness. They are between the ages of 18 to 60+ years old.  The average length of stay in the 19-capacity shelter is six months. While there are a number social and emergency related services available for families with children, there remains a significant gap in similar services for single men.

Safe Haven team members and partners:

  • Close the gap between housing and social services available for those homeless individuals who, perhaps because of their illness, have refused help or have been denied or removed from other homeless programs.

  • Offer residents more than just shelter. With a compassionate approach, team members create a housing environment that is safe, sanitary, flexible, and stable, and place no treatment participation demands on residents, but have high expectations for them.  

  • Assist participants with adjusting to life off the streets, while encouraging and guiding them to willingly accept services that address issues, which led to their homelessness.  

  • Offer Client Service Case Management (CSCM), which is critical to moving participants to permanent housing. CSCM is the center of the supportive services delivery system. The CSCM assists participants in identifying and overcoming barriers to independence by coordinating the approach to ensure the participant receives the resources and supports needed to successfully obtain permanent housing, reintegrate into society, and become self-sufficient.

  • Provide an environment in which services and programmatic activities are designed to support participants in preparation for permanent housing.  

  • Program focus addresses the needs of the participants to develop the skills necessary to transition to independence and permanent housing.

 

Safe Haven participants have access to an array of services that include skill building platforms, personal and character development opportunities, behavioral and physical health services, education, independent living preparation, permanency planning, and access to resources and community contacts.

 

Evidence-based programs at Safe Haven include:

  • Education Training (offered by the Office of Adult Education)

  • Structured leisure (evening and weekend) time

  • Employment Opportunities

  • Health Initiatives Offered by Temple University Medical Students

    • Wellness

    • Health Education

    • Resolving Medical Issues
       

  • Life Skills Development

    • Men Groups

    • Upkeep of Home and Surrounding Property

    • Recovery

    • Overcoming and Concurring Barriers

    • Personal Appearance

    • Grooming

    • Personal Hygiene

    • Budgeting
       

  • Community Connections and Supportive Relationships

    • Familial Engagement and Involvement

    • Community Engagement and Involvement

    • Involvement with Local Civic, Cultural and Religious Institutions

 
Emergency Housing Initiatives and Services
Community Room

The SELF, Inc. Community Center was designed to provide a safe haven and other supportive services to homeless participants who have not yet made a commitment to services, treatment or may have just recently begun treatment and are seeking additional supports.  

This safe, nurturing and non-threatening environment helps participants feel supported in making a commitment to seeking housing related services or permanent housing, D&A treatment, making the most of their treatment experience and receiving other essential social and supportive services.  

 

SELF, Inc. believes the key to effective service for participants of the Center is the creation of a “peer culture environment.”  Peer Mentors are selected from among the participants and serve as role models in the community amongst their peers.  Peer Outreach Worker’s promotes positive principles, shares the message of hope and recovery with participants, and uses the Sanctuary Model each day as a support for those in attendance. 

Realizing that social and recreational activities are crucial to their recovery process, various activities have been added to increase the participants’ awareness.  Every Tuesday and Thursday is “Recovery at the Movies” where movies with positive life lessons and recovery themes are shown, and refreshments such as popcorn and hot dogs are served.  Board games, such as Recovery Bingo, Chess and Checkers are available throughout the day and Tournaments are organized with recovery literature and materials as prizes.  All of these activities highlight the importance of associating fun with recovery so participants can learn to avoid boredom that may lead to relapse.  SELF, Inc. continues to be innovative and creative in attempting to incorporate a therapeutic model that attracts  participation and fosters commitment to housing, treatment and recovery.

 

The SELF, Inc. Community Center is open weekdays Monday - Friday from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM and closed on weekends and holidays.

 

SELF’s Street Outreach team goes out into the community, engages with individuals experiencing street homelessness, and assesses who may be in need of services, emergency housing, Safe Haven placement, Drug & Alcohol treatment, or mental health treatment. Then we (the outreach team) will make a referral to the appropriate service provider.

 

The Outreach Team provides supports and an array of services designed to help make the transition from the streets (homelessness) to emergency housing a little easier. The team assesses the participants’ needs to develop the skills necessary to transition to emergency housing independent and permanent housing.

 

The Outreach Team connects the participant to an array of services, include skill building platforms, personal and character development opportunities, behavioral and physical health services, education, independent living preparation, permanency planning, and access to resources and community contacts

 

After-Hours One Night Placement

The After-Hours program provides one-night, overnight accommodations for single-men who are experiencing homelessness.

Winter Initiative

Winter Initiative provides one-night, overnight accommodations for single men who are experiencing homelessness during colder weather months.

 

 

Case Management Services
 

SELF, Inc. accepts participants for emergency housing and transitional housing referred by the Office of Homeless Services. SELF, Inc. accepts participants for the Safe Haven program referred from the Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual Disability Services.

 

SELF’s bases our case management services  on guiding principles, and proven best practices that focus on inherent strengths of participants to aid in the achievement of the participant’s primary goal -- to end their homelessness.  We achieve this by:

  • Identifying the individuals needs of the participant and creating a housing and support plan.

  • Establishing a partnership between the participant and their case manager. We engage and involve participants in all aspects of their case planning decisions.

  • Providing needed services in a timely manner.

 

Our case managers assume the primary responsibility for assessing the needs of program participants, arrange and coordinate the delivery of essential services and resources to assist participants in obtaining a stable, safe and healthy housing arrangement.

 

Case managers provide an array of housing focused services, which include coordinating appropriate behavioral and physical health services, education, independent living preparation and permanency planning:

 

  • Housing Planning – the purpose being to address any challenges/barriers which may impair a participant from obtaining and sustaining housing.

  • Goal Setting/Service plan development (Identification, Implementation, and goal attainment) – this is a task/action oriented phase of service provision, which puts plans developed between the case manager and participant into an action plan. Timelines and roles are clearly defined which take into account the individual participant’s understanding of their situation, the uniqueness of their specific situation, and what tasks need to be completed in order to obtain the goal of permanent housing.

  • Assessment and linking participants to available housing resources that meet their needs is the primary goal of service delivery.
     

While housing is the focus of service, case managers also work to connect those participants who need additional services to resources and programs providing:
 

  • Employment 

  • Social Security Benefits (if eligible)

  • Medical Benefits and Services

  • Behavioral Health Services/Treatment

  • Legal Services

  • Education Programs

  • Skills development and/or training

 
 
Permanent Supportive Housing Sites and Initiatives
 
Ujima House

Ujima House is SELF’s first permanent supportive housing site and houses ---  unrelated, formerly homelessness individuals who identify as men. Residents of the home generally matriculate from SELF’s emergency housing sites and programs.

 
SELF + Cooperative

SELF + Cooperative is partnership between SELF, Inc., OHS, DBHIDS, and PHA that provides 35 permanent supportive housing units to individuals and families experiencing homelessness. The units are scattered throughout Philadelphia. Families are housed in three to six bed room units.  Individuals are house in three bedrooms units. The initiative incorporates an innovative Shared Housing approach to give low-income individuals access to safe, stable affordable housing. Adult residents are partnered with housing support coaches to help them on their road to self-sufficiency and in their recovery from social determinants of health and substance use and/or mental health disorder. Shared Housing is when unrelated individuals share a house and expenses to create community. To be eligible, individuals and families must have a history of homelessness, have the ability to pay and use 30 percent of their income to pay rent, agree to automatic debit for rent payments, accept one year of housing coaching services and agree to good neighboring practices.

 
WayHome

SELF was recently awarded a grant from the Office of Homeless Services to provide housing assistance service with a focus on vulnerable LGBT+ communities. Way Home is a unique program collaboration between SELF, Inc. and William Way LGBT Community Center that aims to increase housing stability for LGBTQ+ individuals. The Housing Assistance Program will work closely with participants, prospective property owners and managers to secure housing assistance, utility assistance or permanent housing opportunities for homeless individuals and families as quickly as possible and leverage supportive services that will assist the participant to maintain permanent housing. The program will be staffed by one fulltime Housing Assistance Manager.